Facebook Relevance Score: what it means & how to improve yours

February 13, 2015

We do a good deal of Facebook Advertising around here, so when Facebook released information about its new Relevance Score measure, we thought it helpful to break this down.

The main advantage of managing and increasing your Relevance Score is to achieve lower cost per click and more efficient delivery for your Facebook Ads.

What is Facebook’s Relevance Score?

In a nutshell, it’s a measure of how relevant your ad is to the people you’re targeting.…

Read more...

We do a good deal of Facebook Advertising around here, so when Facebook released information about its new Relevance Score measure, we thought it helpful to break this down.

The main advantage of managing and increasing your Relevance Score is to achieve lower cost per click and more efficient delivery for your Facebook Ads.

What is Facebook’s Relevance Score?

In a nutshell, it’s a measure of how relevant your ad is to the people you’re targeting.

Google has had a metric like this for many years. They call it Quality Score, a 1 to 10 scale indicating how good of a search result your ad makes for a given keyword. Advertisers with high scores are rewarded with a lower cost per click, while those with low scores suffer from poor impression share and pay more to reach the same users.

At first glance, the Relevance Score introduced by Facebook promises to do some of the same things.

When your ad is shown to your target audience on Facebook, they have a few options:

1. Respond positively: like it, share it or convert.

2. Respond negatively: hide or report your ad

3. Do nothing.

The more people respond positively to your ad, the better your Relevance Score. The more negative feedback you get, the worse you’re scored. Before your ad is live and has real feedback to rely on, Facebook will make guesses about people’s behavior and assign a starting score.

Where do I see my Facebook Relevance Score? 

You can now add Relevance Score as a column to reports. It looks like this.

Screen Shot 2015-02-13 at 3.35.48 PM

How do I improve Facebook Relevance Score?

There are a number of factors that contribute to your score. Overall, if your ads resonate nicely with your target audience, and especially if they convert well, you’ll have no issues with Relevance Score.

If you need to troubleshoot a low score, here are some good places to start:

1. Tighten your targeting. Try some niche segments with respect to interests, in-market categories, etc. If you achieve a better score by doing this, slowly fan out your targeting from there — or better yet, create dedicated campaigns for each market segment, each with tailored ads and images.

2. Focus on the image. Your prospects will see the image associated with your Facebook Ad before they read the text, so A/B test images rigorously until you find one that resonates. Be careful with risqué photos, though. While they might score a few curious glances at first, inappropriate content is more likely to get your Relevance Score in trouble.

3. Keep your ads fresh. Every ad has an expiration date, especially on Facebook where each user is viewing so many pages daily. Continually cycle your ads and keep it interesting. Fresh engagement from users will help your Relevance Score.

Got other ideas for how to boost Relevance Score? Tell us in the comments.

...Read less


4 Growth and Mentality Hacking Lessons from Rand Fishkin

January 23, 2015

A year ago, I interviewed Rand Fishkin. He was open, candid and insightful.

A few weeks ago, we did a follow up interview. Not only does he have a new hair do, he has a new perspective on life and Moz. In the spirit of Rand-like transparency, I need to come clean — not only did I lose audio altogether in the first interview, but Rand let me do a retake, and the audio/video is still choppy, which is very frustrating considering how much testing and QA I did before both interviews.…

Read more...

A year ago, I interviewed Rand Fishkin. He was open, candid and insightful.

A few weeks ago, we did a follow up interview. Not only does he have a new hair do, he has a new perspective on life and Moz. In the spirit of Rand-like transparency, I need to come clean — not only did I lose audio altogether in the first interview, but Rand let me do a retake, and the audio/video is still choppy, which is very frustrating considering how much testing and QA I did before both interviews.

I may have bungled the audio/video tech, but at least I got from him the secret to marketing success — really, all success — and I’m going to give it to you in bullet points.

1. Perception is not reality

A year ago, Rand make it clear he wasn’t happy: about Moz’s performance, product launch issues, his stewardship of the company … well, just generally. Rand was willing to be open about a fear most of us, well at least I, share … that everything is messed up, and I’m at fault — or so it seems.

A year later, Rand made a critical distinction between perception and reality. In reality, little had changed in a year, but his perspective had noticeably brightened. He was clearly able to separate reality from perception (which, by the way, seems also to create a lot of happiness).

This is a critical take-away for marketers on two levels. First, this is why a marketing strategy/plan is critical; it establishes goals we’re working toward and steps to get there so that we’re not on a constant emotion roller-coaster ride through the process that can cause bad decision-making. Second, our job as marketers and product developers must be to let the data guide us, not our changing perceptions. And if we don’t have enough data to make a decision, create a plan to gather that data and execute.

2. Transparency as a personal imperative

Having known Rand for a while now, I’ve been awed by his willingness to say anything and go anywhere. The pessimist in me wondered whether he was doing it because it’s a good marketing strategy or that’s how good businesses are run.

But Rand set me straight: he’s transparent because he “needs to be” … it’s a compulsion. He admitted there are times it may not make things easy, but he just doesn’t feel right if he’s not 100% open and transparent.

Personally, I think it’s working. Despite any product or competitive challenges, Moz continues to be one of the top independent marketing analytics companies. Moreover, his compulsion for transparency is a welcomed breath of fresh air in a world where many let fear of the competition, negative press or vulnerability run their decision-making.

3. Great products can’t be crowd-sourced

Something that Rand emphasized even more strongly is that product development can’t be crowd-sourced. While customer input is important, there must be a single leader who drives the product forward. He emphasized this in all our conversations, but I wanted to share his more detailed take from our recent conversation (sorry again for the audio/video issues).

I really agree that great products can come from all sorts of teams, but I also relate to Rand’s sentiment that working in small, tight teams is the most fun. Personally, I find the triangle of techie, designer, biz lead to be incredibly powerful.

4. Success is in the Eye of the Beholder

From my perspective, Rand is an online marketing industry God. He was able to leverage his consulting work into developing products that help not only his clients but everyone trying to gain greater insights into search and web analytics.

From his perspective, Rand is doing okay but not totally crushing it. He keeps looking up at how things can be improved, bigger goals.

I can relate and so can many growth hackers, I believe. The truth is that it’s fun to hit bigger and better milestones, but then the floor resets. If we can achieve X growth in Y time, then we need to achieve 3X in Y/2 time. It’s a necessary attitude for exponential growth hacking.

Thanks, Rand, for both of these conversations.

...Read less


2 Minutes of Truth with Rand Fishkin

December 18, 2014

Rand Fishkin is an icon in the online marketing world which, if you’re reading this, you probably already know.

In January, Rand was generous enough to let me interview him to get some more context behind an email he wrote to Moz customers that said:

“I know you likely encountered some bugs and hiccups, and I wanted to express apologies for those issues and gratitude for being an early adopter. We’re already making big improvements based on your feedback.”

I knew he was a thoughtful, multi-dimensional, talented guy, but I had no idea just how remarkably honest and open he is about … everything.

Read more...

Rand Fishkin is an icon in the online marketing world which, if you’re reading this, you probably already know.

In January, Rand was generous enough to let me interview him to get some more context behind an email he wrote to Moz customers that said:

“I know you likely encountered some bugs and hiccups, and I wanted to express apologies for those issues and gratitude for being an early adopter. We’re already making big improvements based on your feedback.”

I knew he was a thoughtful, multi-dimensional, talented guy, but I had no idea just how remarkably honest and open he is about … everything.

I’ve distilled our 20 minute interview down to 2 minutes that touches on a huge variety of topics. Rand is remarkably frank about his self-deprecation, how his marriage is what sustains him through the tough times, comparing his commitment to building a long-term business to other entrepreneurs’ quick wins and how the huge Internet players are taking data from little guys and selling it to the largest advertisers.

One point in particular, which comes at the end of the video, really stuck with me this year.

The great products have a single architect behind them. The ones that have struggled have many fingers in the pot.

My take-away: don’t hide behind others’ opinions. Be a leader.

In January, I’ll post Rand’s 1-year-later follow-up take.

...Read less